Blog
26
04
2016
Personal Trainer, Liverpool Street

Staying in shape away from home

Staying in shape away from home

Everybody travels.

Whether it’s for business, pleasure, vacation or world domination at some point in our lives we all depart from the comfort of our personal ‘hood’ to visit another location. It might be a quick trip to the next town over for a business conference or a massive adventure halfway around the world for months at a time. No matter what kind of trip it is, one thing is certain:

Our normal routines get completely thrown out the window when traveling:

  • If you work out in a gym, suddenly you might not have access to any equipment.
  • If you run around your neighborhood, suddenly you no longer have a familiar path to follow.
  • If you usually prepare your own meals, suddenly you don’t have a kitchen or fridge.
  • If you’re used to a good night’s sleep, suddenly you’re sleeping at odd hours in different time zones.

We are creatures of habit – while working a normal day job, we can stick to a routine pretty easily (wake up at the same time, eat all meals at the same time, work out at the same time, go to sleep at the same time).  However, when we start traveling, absolutely nothing is familiar and the slightest speed bump can be enough to screw things up.

Luckily, there is hope!  Here are our secret weapons for staying in shape on a city break. 

Walking

With more time to spare and places to explore, holidays are the perfect excuse to swap the car for a pair of trainers. It’s an ideal way to take in your new surroundings and give your body a good workout at the same time.

Regular walking is good for you because cardiovascular exercise strengthens the heart and lungs, bringing more nutrients and oxygen to your tissues and helping to remove waste from our body more quickly.

Together with healthy eating and other forms of exercise, walking can also help with weight loss and tone up muscles.

Walking on different types of terrain such as sand or pebbles will also work your muscles even more. Each time you take a step on an uneven terrain your body tries to steady itself which means you naturally tense up your muscles helping to tone up these areas. If you want a more challenging workout that will help you burn up even more calories, try walking up and down hills.

How many calories can you burn?

A gentle walk can burn as many as 100 calories a mile – or around 150 calories every half an hour.

Bodyweight Training

Now is the perfect time to get to know your own body and its the ready packed tool for keeping you in shape on holiday. You can move your body through a series of squats, lunges and push ups that will keep you trim over the vacation.

Perhaps, you could even utilise your hotel room to increase the demand on your body. Use the side of the bed for tricep dips and incline press ups. Full to the brim suit cases double up as weights to be used for overhead presses and deadlifts.

For those who really want to stay on top of their training why don’t you pack a Suspension trainer, better known by the brand name TRX, so you can work your body against gravity. This suspension trainer can be hooked over the door enabling you to add rows, single leg work and a wide variety of core exercises to your hotel workout.

Simply pick 5 or 6 base exercises each day. Work all out on an exercise for 30 seconds before taking a 15 second rest. Then move onto the next exercise. Once you have completed all exercises thats one circuit complete. Repeat three times. Try this workout fasted before you hit the buffet breakfast to minimise the damage.

How many calories can you burn?

A 30 minute HIIT workout can burn up to 500kcal in half an hour. Not only that, it will leave you with a fat burning effect for the rest of the day. This is not an excuse to go all out on the jugs of Sangria!

The above photo is me staying in shape whilst on holiday in Australia last summer. I think we can all agree its better than being stuck inside an overcrowded, smelly, sweaty gym!

author: Matt Williams

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